The forgotten victims of Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Health on Today: ‘Pinktober’ ignores breast cancer patients who can’t be cured, some say  From the article:

“I can’t celebrate because I’m not a survivor,” said Clark, who was diagnosed in 2010 with an aggressive Stage III cancer that quickly advanced. “There’s not a cure.”

“The message has really been skewed,” says Knackmuhs, 61, of Wyckoff, N.J., who was diagnosed with Stage IV disease in 2009. “It’s so associated with selling products and shopping and dubious product endorsement.”

I’m always skeptical of something that is treated like a universal good — “I was going to spend the money/go to the event anyway and now some of that money goes to breast cancer awareness!” — especially when large corporations enthusiastically jump on board. After doing some research into this for a presentation I did for class last semester, I’m collecting examples of pink co-branding this October with hopes of doing a full study on the topic in the future.

For now, I’m going to skip my rant and let others speak. Read the article linked above, and from my presentation, these quotes:

  • “My disease has become a marketable commodity and nothing more.  The sad irony in all of this is that I believe Komen’s approach to cause-marketing has only served to undermine the seriousness of this disease in the public’s perception.” – Rachel, who shared her story of metastatic breast cancer at cancerculturenow.blogspot.com, until she died this February  (If you can stand the heartbreak, read her husband’s post about enduring a “Paint The Town Pink” campaign less than 3 months after Rachel’s death.  It’s agonizing.)
  • “Telling an authentic story about an illness that is heavily laden with cultural expectations about femininity, normalcy, and triumphant survivorship requires a new way of thinking and speaking. Falling on the margins of the cultural framework, these kinds of stories can be threatening and hard to hear.“ – Gayle Sulik in Pink Ribbon Blues: How Breast Cancer Culture Undermines Women’s Health
  • “Fashion statements aside, once I became a person with breast cancer, it didn’t take long at all for me to develop a very low tolerance for all things pink. The sheer ubiquity of pink as the symbol of the fight against breast cancer is overwhelming. And one of the things that you discover… is that everyone … seems to assume that you are now the local poster chick…everyone assumes that you have the interest, time, energy, inclination and funds to contribute to or participate in every bleeping event, cause, or group that is even remotely associated with helping everyone else not end up like you.“ – A breast cancer patient named Kathi
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One thought on “The forgotten victims of Breast Cancer Awareness Month

  1. While I love the attention that Breast Cancer has gotten over the years, I secretly abhor the constant marketing campaigns that gain greater attention than the cause for which they are “supposedly” supporting. There have been great strides in the amount of attention that Breast Cancer has gotten, but at the same time, corporations have made millions of dollars by jumping on the bandwagon.

    I will gladly march with survivors in any sponsored walk, but when it comes to actually buying a product that states it will donate a portion of its profits to the research, I have to wonder, how honest, and truthful they are being. I believe that we as people, need to take a step back and realize why we are supporting this company and that company, is it because of a slogan and a little pinkish hue to their packaging, or is it because we honestly believe in what we are doing. If anybody wishes to support Breast Cancer awareness, then donate directly to the foundation, more than to company a or company b who is trying to make a quick buck it seems on someone’s condition.

    Those are simply my thoughts on the issue. 🙂

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