Spirit of 1848 sessions at the APHA Annual Meeting

You may remember Nancy Krieger’s work from last semester.  The wonderful Spirit of 1848 group, a collection of activist health professionals and social scientists that she chairs, has a host of great-looking sessions at the APHA conference this weekend in San Francisco (that’s the American Public Health Association).

Two panels that look particularly interesting:

CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES ON LIFECOURSE AND TIME TREND ANALYSES: SOCIAL JUSTICE & THE POLITICS OF PUBLIC HEALTH DATA (Session 3375.0; Moscone Convention Center South, Esplanade Ballroom 302) 

2:30 PM: Introduction: “Critical perspectives on lifecourse and time trend analyses: social justice & the politics of public health data” – Catherine Cubbin, PhD 

2:35 PM: Planning for state and local public health services in a genomic era: health equity across the life course – Laura Senier, Jason Orne 

2:55 PM: Trending politics, trending health: how divergent developments in welfare states explain diverging mortality profiles in wealthy nations – Jason Beckfield, PhD and Clare Bambra, PhD 

3:15 PM: Scenes from AMERICAN BIRTHRIGHT (working title): a documentary and multimedia project linking early child development to a more equitable and prosperous America – Larry Adelman and Rachel Poulain

EMBODYING HISTORY – AND CHANGING IT: HEALTH INEQUITIES, SOCIAL JUSTICE, AND BIOLOGY IN CONTEXT – THE CASE OF BREAST CANCER (Session 3448.0; Moscone Convention Center South, Esplanade Ballroom 303) 

4:30 PM: Introduction: “Embodying history – and changing it: health inequities, social justice, and biology in context – the case of breast cancer” – Anne-Emanuelle Birn, MA, ScD 

4:35 PM: How cancer crossed the color line – Keith Wailoo, PhD 

4:55 PM: Embodying history and understanding health inequities: on emergent phenotypes and the four histories of the breast cancer estrogen receptor – evolutionary, pathological, individual, and societal – Nancy Krieger, PhD 

5:15 PM: How community-based participatory outreach education and research impacts American Indian breast cancer programs to address inequities – Linda Burhansstipanov, DrPH 

Advertisements

New wiki for anthropological source materials- help build this resource!

From the AAA:

The American Anthropological Association has started a
Wiki<http://anthroregistry.wikia.com/wiki/Wiki_Content> and we’re
reaching out to everyone for any feedback and contributions you might
be able to provide. The goal of this wiki is to help researchers
locate anthropological source materials.

One of the effects of the web has been to create myriad crevices and
crannies of information. Did you know that Frederick Starr’s
notebooks<http://anthroregistry.wikia.com/wiki/Starr_Congo_Expedition>
(12 volumes of field notes) have been put on line?

Do you have a website of ethnographic or anthropological source
materials you’d like people to know about? Add it to the
wiki<http://anthroregistry.wikia.com/wiki/Wiki_How-To> and help others
benefit.

Have you deposited your personal papers in an archive? Building on the
efforts of the Council for the Preservation of Anthropological
Records<http://copar.org/>, we are turning to anthropologists to join
together and share information about the location of field notes,
photographs, sound recordings, and other primary sources.

The wiki is the perfect place to promote your own research and
discover interesting new materials. You can ensure that the location
of your ethnographic materials isn’t lost or forgotten simply by
typing up and publishing a new page on the wiki. The registry needs
you though. This is a crowd-sourced effort so it relies on the efforts
of individual anthropologists to identify their research. We encourage
you to test it and add your own entries. Already the wiki houses
information on fascinating research such as the Khipu Database and the
Tsimane Amazonian Panel Study. We hope you can help your colleagues
identify intriguing projects that might otherwise be easily
overlooked. We hope you can help your colleagues identify intriguing
projects that might otherwise be easily overlooked. This is a
cutting-edge tool for the new era of anthropology and the 21st century
anthropologist!