Meeting the needs of child trafficking survivors

When a child has endured sexual trafficking, his or her problems can endure for a lifetime. Seeing this as a public health issue, the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, the Advisory Council on Child Trafficking, and Goldman Sachs 10,000 Women organized the “Symposium on Meeting the Needs of Child Trafficking Survivors” earlier in May.

Seventeen videos of presentations from the symposium are available online. I’m grateful whenever an organization shares material like this so that more of us can learn from it. The few videos I’ve watched so far are interesting and thought-provoking.

Viability at 23 weeks 6 days

New chances accompany new moral dilemmas when technology is applied to human reproduction.  Don’t miss this thought-provoking podcast from Radiolab:

Technology has had a profound effect on how we get pregnant, give birth, and think about life and death. The decision to become parents was not an easy one for Kelley and Tom. Even after they sorted out their relationship issues and hopes for the future, getting pregnant wasn’t easy. But, thanks to a lot of technology, they found a way to a baby. Then, about halfway through the pregnancy, the trouble began. Neonatal nurse practitioner Diane Loisel describes helping Kelley and Tom make the most important decision of their lives. And Nita Farahany helps Jad and Robert understand the significance of viability, and how technology has influenced its meaning…making a difficult idea even harder to pin down. [Listen here]

(tip of my Stormy Kromer cap to the Twitter feeds of Somatosphere and AnthroRepro)

Culture bound syndromes in girls

Two occasions of mysterious illnesses among girls: culture bound syndromes?  The first is a Radiolab podcast about an 1962 outbreak of contagious laughter in Tanzania and the second is a  New York Times Magazine article about a group of girls from Le Roy, New York (near Rochester).

Contagious Laughter Radiolab Podcast

The Mystery of 18 Twitching Teenagers in Le Roy

Lydia Parker, foreground, at home with her sister. She got one of the bruises on her face when an uncontrollable tic caused her to hit herself with her cellphone.
(c) Gillian Laub/The New York Times

Matt K. shared this article during the Winter 2012 semester class, wondering if this is an example of a culture-bound syndrome: Mysterious nodding disease debilitates children

“A sufferer of Nodding Disease is put in a child’s crib at Antanga Health Center, Uganda, so that he doesn’t injure himself. The affliction is associated with violent epilepsy-like convulsions that can lead to permanent disabilities.” – CNN