A surprising model for health system improvement

In the debate over how to improve health care in the US, systems in other countries are often held up as models.  You know, countries like Rwanda.

Yes, Rwanda.

A thought provoking piece yesterday on The Atlantic made that comparison, citing analysis by Dr. Paul Farmer.  From the article:

Over the last ten years, Rwanda’s health system development has led to the most dramatic improvements of health in history. Rwanda is the only country in sub-Saharan Africa on track to meet most of the Millennium Development Goals. Deaths from HIV, TB, and malaria have each dropped by roughly 80 percent over the last decade and the maternal mortality ratio dropped by 60 percent over the same period. Even as the population has increased by 35 percent since 2000, the number of annual child deaths has fallen by 63 percent. In turn, these advances bolstered Rwanda’s economic growth: GDP per person tripled to $580, and millions lifted themselves from poverty over the last decade.

One explanation for this dramatic improvement is that the genocide in Rwanda allowed for a clean slate upon which a new program could be built.  Farmer and others reject this explanation, however.  A recent report focuses more on interdepartmental coordination and central planning with health as a priority.  The article is a good summary and the BMJ research paper with Farmer as lead researcher has more details.

Advertisements